Who’s writing Clinical Briefs?

An independent medical writer who (naïvely) believe that medical research funded by taxes and supported by patients should be used to help people.

A decade of stem cell research as an academic immunologist taught me just now much research is conducted around the world. Much of the knowledge we generate circulates within academia, fueling further research. From what I can tell, most of the findings have no commercial value. That is to say, they won’t help sell drugs, medical devices, journal subscriptions, conference registrations, or help with recruiting new students. No commercial value means no incentive to syndicate this information and spread the word.

But they can help people make more informed treatment decisions, right?

For instance, a study found that in a patient taking an opioid pain killer, as few as 4 drinks could lower respiration by a total of 42%. Wouldn’t this information be more compelling for a patient getting a script for the first time, than “don’t drink while you take these pills”?

Or how about this study linking some common over-the-counter medications with the risk of serious heat stroke in those 80 or over. Knowing this, if I were someone over 80 taking a blood-pressure pill, I’d probably pack an extra bottle of water when I go out in the summer, just in case.

I have great respect for clinicians, nurses, pharmacists, and therapists. I cannot do what they do, but I can use what I know to catch these studies that can help people. I’d be satisfied even if I manage to help just one person.

Out of this dream, I created Clinical Briefs. Thank you for visiting and I sincerely hope you’ve found something of use.

– Holden Caulfield, PhD